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Bio

Abby Bullard (1994, Raleigh, North Carolina) received her Bachelor's of Fine Arts in Printmaking from the Savannah College of Art & Design in June 2016. She has exhibited in group shows in her hometown, Georgia, Nebraska, California, and Lacoste, France. In 2014, she received "Best in Printmaking" for her work in the Nebraska National Undergraduate Juried Art Exhibition at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln. Her work is also in the SGC International permanent collection at the Zuckerman Museum of Art in Kennesaw, Georgia. In September 2016, she became the Visitor Services Associate (VSA) at Atlanta Contemporary. In the past 10 months, she has been instrumental to the increase in donations at the front desk by 800%.

Artist Statement

The human skin is not just a protective layer of the body, but a vehicle of memory. For every wrinkle, scar, or mark there is a story to tell. In order to deal with the inevitability of age, Abby Bullard’s work has become a means to preserve and revere the beauty and delicacy of the skin. Senescence is the condition or process of deterioration that comes with age or the biological aging process. This transformation happens to every living being from birth to death. In its organic timeline, senescence leaves behind remnants of one’s experiences throughout life. Each work represents a fragment of a larger body, and in the context of this series, the beauty in accumulation of experience works to overcome the realities of age.

ArtsATL Review

"Senescence Revisited by Abby Bullard is fleshy yet ethereal. Giving it some time to let unfold the tiny details like delicately frayed edges and tiny copper wire stitches. The pale and wrinkled sheets of framed paper are infused with subtle washes of color, the green and lavender of veins and bruises. Like pinned insect shadowboxes, there is a bit of death and morbid curiosity in these monoprints, like pale flakes of skin carefully preserved and arranged. The work evokes Eva Hesse's latex and rubber works as they look now, yellowing, aging and losing something."

- Angela Bortone, Review: MINT achieves synchronicity with Downtown Players Club with 'In Touch'"